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SFR QUOTE

強弱柔剛あるべからず
Kyôjaku jyûgô aru bekarazu,

故にこの心から離れ
Yue ni kono kokoro kara hanare,

空という一字に悟り
Kû to iu ichiji ni satori,

体また無しとして之に配す
Tai mata nashi ni shite kore ni haisu

“You should not have only strength or weakness, suppleness or hardness.
Therefore, remove such thoughts from your heart.
Awaken yourself to the shape of the character Ku (void).
Rest yourself in the body that became Mu (nothingness).”

✧ FROM THE SHINDEN FUDŌ-RYÛ SHIRON (神伝不動流史論)

#ninja #ninjutsu #shinobiwinds #KacemZoughari #Bujinkan #SeishinDojo

TAKAMATSU-SENSEI

The term ‘battô-jutsu’ (抜刀術), or ‘nukutô no jutsu’, literally translated as ‘the art to extract the blade’, indicates the practice which consists of drawing the sword and to cross, avoid, or strike, all within in a single movement, without the enemy being able to see or feel one’s initial intention. Relations between the various traditions of battô-jutsu and the first three sword traditions of Japan (Nen-ryû, Kage-ryû, & Kashima-ryû), postulate that this art existed already within these three founding sword schools. Many chronicles describe such sword luminaries as Bizen No kami, Bokuden, Hidetsuna, & Muneyoshi, as well as their disciples, as excelling in the art of iaijutsu. However, the techniques were a collection of various and often vague principles for using the body that led to a freedom of interpretation. The first tradition which did specialize and codify this art into a precise methodology was founded by Hayashizaki Jinsuke (1542 -?) at the beginning of the Edo period. Hayashizaki transmitted his method to only three disciples. One would go on to become his successor and the other two would eventually found their own traditions. During second half of the Edo period, the schools resulting from Hayashizaki-ryû used the term of ‘iai’ (居合), rather than the term of ‘battô-jutsu’. There exists a score of terms which all are read as ‘Iai’, but are translated broadly as the action of ‘engaging and fighting an approaching enemy’. ‘Iai’ means ‘to link’ and ‘to be’, which can therefore be translated as ‘linking the intention and the movement in a moment when the technique must be carried out’. The large majority of the techniques of iai-jutsu, found in traditions born during the second half of the Edo period, were practiced starting from sitting positions, where the movements were extremely restricted.

✧ DR. KACEM ZOUGHARI

#KacemZoughari #ninja #ninjutsu #onmitsukage #shinobiwinds #Bujinkan

STILL 4

Through the years many have questioned the validity of certain martial traditions, especially those related to the ninpō arts. When researched in depth, ‘walls’ are constantly hit when attempting to gather any viable information concerning events and solid historical facts on these ryū-ha and the men of their genealogy. Such abrupt ‘dead-ends’ of research efforts usually occur around the late Edo period of Japanese history (the mid to late 1800’s). This holds true also for any viable information on the past masters of these traditions. But why? When attempting such research, one must take into account the nature of the ryū-ha in question. Many traditions, especially those related to ninjutsu, survived due to an intense cloak of secrecy that was never compromised. This meant that the true name of the tradition was only known to the soke, or headmaster, and his eventual successor. Any name given to the public was a false name, used as a deceptive front and sometimes changed often. This still holds true today. Names such as Gikan-ryū, Togakure-ryū, & Shinden Fudo-ryū, for instance, are cover names used to hide the true title of the tradition. This explains why any research into the history of these given names ends up in utter futility on the part of the historian or researcher. This is also the case for past masters that are difficult to investigate. Names such as ‘Shinryuken Toda’ and even ‘Toshitsugu Takamatsu’ were ‘nom de plum’, or pen names, used to hide their true identity, past, and relations. Often, these men had several identities to help them maneuver quietly and undetected through dangerous times, such as the late Edo and early Meiji eras, for example. This protected not only the individual and the knowledge they held, but their families as well. Remember, these men were utter and true masters of illusion, disinformation, and psychological warfare. The proof of this is in the convincing of researchers or those of the ‘by the book’ mentality that the traditions and masters in question were either made-up or never truly existed, because no concrete evidence can be found to prove otherwise. Yet, as history has proven, just because evidence cannot be found does not mean that it does not exist. It simply is in the secretive hands of the headmaster of the tradition, kept safe from the hands of people of ill-intent, opportunists, deceptive con artists, and the public at large, and shown only in part to those who truly practice and sacrifice to help keep the tradition alive.

#ninja #ninjutsu #ninpo #shinobiwinds #Bujinkan

ONMITSU KAGE

Onmitsu Kage Co. 隠密陰 is a paid monthly subscription-based video on demand feed of world-renowned ninpō-taijutsu scholar and practitioner Dr. Kacem Zoughari that you will not find anywhere else.

#OnmitsuKage #KacemZoughari #ninjutsu #ninja #shinobiwinds

http://www.onmitsukage.com

YASUJI4

Yasuji Kuroda, (1897 – 1976), was the 13th Sōke of Shishin Takuma-ryū jujutsu, Komagawa Kaishin-ryū kenjutsu, Tamiya-ryū, Tsubaki Kotengu-ryū bōjutsu, Seigyoku Oguri-ryū, and Otengu (Daitengu)-ryū. Renowned and respected greatly for his rare skill by his peers and other swordsmen of the day, a number of anecdotes about the man have survived that paint a unique portrait of a rare warrior and master, the type that only seemed to exist in the civil war annals of Old Japan.

* As a child, Yasuji often went to a liquor store to buy alcohol. There was a large dog that would always bark fiercely at him and would give chase when he passed. One day, he opened the wooden door of the shop to hail the owner, the dog suddenly rushed upon him. He leapt face first into the danger, drawing his sword, and decapitated the animal.

* Once, he was attacked at gunpoint by a couple of violent thieves, as he made his way along a quiet road in town. With almost imperceptible speed, he drew his sword and cut the gun wielding attacker’s revolver in half.

* On one occasion, he cut two thick ‘makiwara’ cleanly in
half with one stroke of a blunt saber.

* Yasuji was also said to be capable of drawing and cutting
a ‘shinai’ (bamboo practice sword) that was sent into the
air.

* Once, a sword-weilding ronin attacked he and his friend in the country. When the ronin swung his sword, the blade broke away from the ‘tsuka’ (handle) and was sailing towards the head of Yasuji’s friend. Yasuji instantly, and with seemingly impossible speed, stepped in front of his friend and let the blade pierce his own shoulder to save his life. The entire incident took place in a tenth of a second.

#YasujiKuroda #martialarts #katana #budo #swordsman #Japan #ryu #Japanesehistory

KERI

First, the word ‘henka’ is constituted of two kanji. The first one ‘hen’ (変) can be read ‘kawaru’ or ‘kaeru’ and means ‘change’, ‘turn’, ‘ alter’, ‘vary’, ‘strange’, ‘peculiar’, ‘odd’, ‘unusual’, or ‘eccentric’, and it is used for many situations and actions, not only in the koryû’s world. The second kanji, ‘ka’ (化) can be read ‘bakasu’, ‘bakesu’, or ‘kawaru’ and means ‘bewitch’, or ‘enchant’. When you add the two kanji’s meanings together, of course in a general point of view, it means ‘variation’ or ‘transformation’, but it’s much deeper than that, as is always the case with koryû’s science and knowledge. It’s also important to underline the fact that the meaning of the ‘henka’ should be transposed to its historical context and not use the first definition found in the regular dictionary. The studies and research performed on various records, such as ‘densho’, ‘denki’, ‘shuki’, ‘shiki, about koryû and their founders show that it’s always during a moment, a crucial instance in combat, where the question is about living or dying. Something happened and the founder or master, who was in a very bad position, performed an unexpected technique which surprised his enemy. It’s not about a special form, though. It’s about how to adapt and transform a technique, that is not working on an enemy, into something more accurate and deep that arises suddenly from nowhere. Sometimes the master can remember what he did and try to work on it. The main problem is when the disciple, who learns the ‘henka’, creates a form from that or a ‘kata’, and thinks, ‘This is the real form!’ – DR. KACEM ZOUGHARI